Plasma Rich Platelet (PRP) Therapy 2018-01-11T23:28:06+00:00

PRP Therapy

This go-to treatment isn’t just for professional athletes, this game changing therapy might be an option for you. Athlete or not, sore and injured muscles, joints and bones can significantly impact your lifestyle and normal activities.

Arctic Spine is the only clinic in Alaska to offer this cutting-edge therapy.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)

What is PRP?

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is a revolutionary new treatment used to treat sports and musculoskeletal injuries, degenerative spine conditions and is a pioneering technique in aesthetic medicine. Arctic Spine is the only clinic in Alaska to offer this cutting-edge procedure. PRP utilizes nothing else but the healing and rejuvenative properties that exist already within you by isolating the Platelet Rich Plasma that is in your own blood and creating an autologous healing product that cannot be reproduced synthetically.

Typical Whole Blood Composition

Typical Platelet Rich Plasma Composition

Concentrated Platelets Help Accelerate Healing of Injured Tissues

The PRP procedure is commonly used to treat the following conditions:

  • Osteoarthritis of the Knee, Shoulder, Hip and Spine
  • Rotator Cuff Tears
  • Chronic Plantar Fasciitis
  • ACL Injuries
  • Pelvic Pain and Instability
  • Back and Neck Injuries
  • Tennis Elbow
  • Ankle Sprains
  • Tendinitis
  • Ligament Sprains
  • Degenerative disc disease

How is PRP Done?

At our facility, blood is drawn from the patient (just like getting a blood test) and placed in a special centrifuge. The centrifuge spins to separate the Red Blood Cells, and the remaining platelets and plasma are then highly concentrated. (The White Blood Cells, which comprise only a fraction of the total cells, go along for the ride with the platelets and plasma.) The red blood cells are discarded, and the resulting platelet concentrate is used for treatment. In some cases the injections are given under direct ultrasound guidance to ensure accurate placement of the platelet concentrate in the damaged area. The entire treatment, from blood draw, to solution preparation, to injection, takes approximately 45 minutes.

How Will PRP Help Me?

  • The body’s first response to soft tissue injury is to deliver platelet cells
  • Packed with growth and healing factors, platelets initiate repair and attract the critical assistance of stem cells
  • PRP’s natural healing process intensifies the body’s efforts by delivering a higher concentration of platelets directly into the area in need
  • To create PRP, a small sample of your blood is drawn (similar to a lab test sample) and placed in a centrifuge that spins the blood at high speeds, separating the platelets from the other components. The process is handled manually by a lab technician, producing higher concentrations of platelets and a much more pure concentration of the beneficial blood components
  • The PRP is then injected into and around the point of injury, jump-starting and significantly strengthening the healing process
  • Because it is your own blood that is used, there is no risk of a transmissible infection and a very low risk of allergic reaction

How Does PRP Work?

Platelets are a specialized type of blood cell. Blood is made up of 93% red cells (RBCs), 6% platelets, 1% white blood cells (WBCs), and plasma. Most people associate platelets with clot formation. While that certainly is an important function of platelets, they are also very much involved in injury healing. Human platelets are naturally extremely rich in connective tissue growth factors. Injecting these growth factors into damaged ligaments, tendons, and joints stimulates a natural repair process. But in order to benefit from these natural healing proteins, the platelets must first be concentrated. In other words, PRP recreates and stimulates the body’s natural healing process.

For example, corticosteroid or “cortisone” injection, as they are commonly referred to, cannot be injected into weight bearing tendons such as the patellar tendon of the knee and Achilles tendon of the ankle because then can weaken the tendon and cause it to rupture. PRP can safely be used in these tendons without the risk of rupture.

FAQ’s

Most insurance plans do NOT pay for PRP injections. Arctic Spine is offering this therapy for an introductory rate of $900 (normally $1,350).

The reason why PRP is not covered is because, according to Medicare “there is not scientific evidence to prove its effectiveness.”

The  truth is, without big pharmaceutical companies funding the research, there will never be any extensive clinical trials for PRP injections. All research about Platelet-Rich Plasma comes directly from small and independent sources.

And as research dollars are not poured into this, all evidence around PRP will remain anecdotal.

The good news is that PRP is different on its own: it’s massive popularity today (mostly word-of-mouth) proves that it’s more effective than the so-called “high-value” treatments that are approved by health plans today.

Plus, the role PRP plays is bigger than most other treatments. It doesn’t just offer a solution — the impact is often life-changing. Pains are relieved side-effect-free. Surgeries are avoided. It saves tendons and ligaments in the thousands everyday particularly those in the joints: ankles, knees, shoulders, spine, elbow etc.

Professional athletes love it. The most recent one is Red Sox right-hander Clay Buchholz, who had platelet-rich plasma injection for strained flexor muscle in his right elbow.

Because lidocaine interferes with the platelet function, it is not used during the PRP injection. Unlike a steroid injection, there may be pain for the next few days after an injection. For the days preceeding the injection and for the first week after the injections it is critical to avoid anti-inflammatory medications, including Advil, Motrin, ibuprofen, Aleve, Celebrex and aspirin (unless prescribed by your heart doctor). These will interfere with the healing response. Tylenol is OK. We can prescribe pain medication also.

Anytime a needle is placed anywhere in the body, even getting blood drawn, there is a risk of infection, bleeding, and nerve damage. However, these are very rare. Other complications, though rare, vary depending on the area being treated, and will be discussed by your doctor before starting treatment. Because PRP uses your own blood adverse reactions are rare.

Studies suggest an improvement of 80-85%. Some patients experience complete relief of their pain. The results are generally permanent.

TYPES OF PAIN WE TREAT

GASTROINTESTINAL

Hiatial Hernia
Peptic Ulcer

EAR, NOSE AND THROAT

Trigeminal Neuralgia

GENERAL HEALTH

Herniated Disk
Lumbar Radiculopathy (Sciatica)
Osteoarthritus of the Knee
Osteoporosis
Trigger Point Injections
Where Lower Back Pain Begins
Where Neck Pain Begins
Whiplash

Brain and Mental Health

Depression
Generalized Anxiety Disorder
Post-Whiplash Headache
Stroke
Substance Abuse
Traumatic Brain Injury
Occipital Neuralgia (Arnolds Neuralgia)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
Substance Dependence
Tension Headache
Trigeminal Neuralgia

Diabetes Conditions

Diabetic Foot
Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) and Diabetes
Hyperglycemia (Low Blood Glucose) and Diabetes
Prediabetes
Diabetes (Type 2)

Diabetes Treatments

Diabetes and Foot Care
Diabetes and Exercise
Diabetes and Healthy Eating
Managing Type 2 Diabetes

Digestive and Urinary Systems Conditions

Constipation (Adults)

Heart, Blood and Blood Vessel Conditions

High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

Infectious Diseases

Shingles (Herpes Zoster)

Lung Conditions

Asthma
Bronchitis
COPD
Emphysema

Medications

Opioids Medications
Opioids (Common Side Effects)
Opioids (Dependence and Addiction)
Opioids and Chronic Pain Management
Using Opioids Safely

Sleep Disorders

Insomnia
Restless Leg Syndrome
Sleep Apnea

Systemic and Genetic Disorders and Conditions

Anemia
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
Fibromyalgia
Overweight and Obesity

Head Non-Surgical Procedures

Botox Injections for Chronic Migraine

Peripheral Non-Surgical Procedures

Fascia Illiaca Block
Brachial Pleaxus Block
Femoral Nerve Block
Poplitea Fossa Block

Spine Conditions

Cervical Radiculopathy
Compression Fractures of the Spine
Facet Joint Syndrome
Herniated Discs
Lumbar Radiculopathy (Sciatica)
Myelopathy
Spinal Stenosis
Spondylolisthesis
Spondylosis
Where Lower Back Pain Begins

Spine Non-Surgical Procedures

Caudal Epidural Steroid Injection
Cervical Epidural Steroid Injection
Discography
Facet Joint Injections
Flouroscopic Guided Piriformis Injection
Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection
Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection (without contrast)
Lumbar Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection
Medial Branch Block (Cervical)
Radiofrequency Neurotomy of the Lumbar Facets
Sacrolliac Joint Steroid Injection
Stellate Ganglion Block

Spine Surgical Procedures

Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion
Cervical Posterior Foraminotomy
Laminectomy
Laminectomy (cervical) with Fusion
Lumbar Disc Microsurgery
Lumbar Discoscopic Discectomy
Micro Endoscopic Discectomy
Minimally Invasive Lumbar Microdecompression
Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion
Spinal Fusion (Lumbar)
Selective Endoscopic Disectomy

Foot and Ankle Procedures

PRP Therapy
PRP Therapy for Achilles Tendon Pain
PRP Therapy for Peroneal Tendonitis
PRP Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis

Hip and Thigh Conditions

Sacroiliac Joint Pain
Hip Joint Injection
PRP Therapy
Ultrasound-Guided Illoinguinal Nerve Block

Knee Procedures

PRP Therapy
Flouroscopic Guided Steroid Injection for Knee Pain
Genicular Nerve Block
HYALGAN Injection for Knee Pain (Flourscopic Guided)
Visco-supplementation for Arthritis of the Knee

Shoulder Procedures

Suprascapular Nerve Block (Flouroscopically Guided)